Monday, October 17, 2016

CANDY MAKING 


This blog explains all about the Candy, its history, classification, process of making & all other aspects to educate the audience about its popularity.

WHAT IS CANDY?
Candy, also called sweets or lollies, is a confection that features sugar as a principal ingredient.



 HISTORY
Prior to the 1900s, candy was commonly sold unwrapped from carts in the street, where it was exposed to dirt and insects. With advancements in technology, wax paper was adopted, and foil and cellophane were imported from France by DuPont in 1925. Necco packagers were one of the first companies to package without human touch.

CLASSIFICATION





TOOLS USED

Pots: Heavy (copper, anodized aluminum, cast aluminum or cast iron) pot with deep and straight sides; this will help prevent boil overs.  It should be large enough to hold 3 to 4 times the volume of the ingredients.

Spoons: Long handled wooden spoons unless you can find heat proof metal spoons. Make sure it is clean and dry EVERY TIME you dip it in the candy mixture to stir.

Candy Thermometer: Experienced candy makers use the Cold Water Test and know when it's done, but use a Candy Thermometer at all times. Select one that registers from 100 to 400 degrees F.

Pastry brushes: Whenever a recipe calls for a hot, cooked sugar mixture, you will need to wash down the sides of the pan with a heat-proof pastry brush dipped in water.

Cooling and kneading surface: Marble or granite surface or vegetable-sprayed parchment paper placed on the back of a baking sheet, or a Silpat mat.

 Aluminum foil: For a candy making surface that can take the heat, use a sheet of foil. 



CANDY MAKING INGREDIENTS

Crystalline table sugar: Use the best quality granulated, everyday white CANE sugar when making candy.

Corn Syrup: use light corn syrup if not specified in a recipe. If you only have dark, it can be used, but the candy will have a slight molasses taste and color. If the recipe specifies, follow it.

Molasses: conveniently for butterscotch makers, molasses contains a very dark caramel with a distinct burnt edge and a bit of sharpness. Molasses is so strongly flavored, that butterscotch recipes rarely use it without it being diluted



ACIDS: Cream of Tartar, Lemon Juice, Vinegar.

FATS: Butter and fats affect the sugar's final chemical structure.
      
DAIRY:  Use heavy cream for its higher butterfat than milk, gives candy a smooth texture and 
mouth feel. 

FLAVORING: Candy oils can be used and are the preferred flavoring for candy.
     
FOOD COLORING: For sugar based candy, food coloring is best to use. It is a liquid, which comes in little bottles available at any supermarket or from a cake decorating store (lots of colors).

GELATIN: powdered or leaf, starch, pectin, or gum to the boiling mixture the sugar will gel and make products like jelly beans, Turkish delight, and licorices.

 METHOD OF MAKING CANDY

STEP 1: PREPARE THE SUGAR SOLUTION

STEP 2: COOK (BOIL) THE SUGAR SOLUTION INTO A CONCENTRATED SUGAR  SYRUP 

STEPS 3 AND 4: COOLING AND BEATING (OPTIONAL)

TEXTURES OF CANDIES

Type 1:  Tiny crystals result in candies with soft, creamy and smooth textures. Ex:- Fondant , Marshmallows

Type 2: Candies with larger crystals. Ex:-  Rock Candy, Gummy Candies *(Gummy bears, Jelly beans, Gumdrops) , Hard Candy (Lollipops) , Toffee.

CONCLUSION

Candies are hot favourites among children & they come in variety of colours & shapes to attract this category of guest. It is quiet complicated work as the ingredients & methods implied are very sensitive to handle. Candy making requires a real expertise & close understanding of colour & flavor combinations. 


By BRAND CAI,Faculty

2 comments:

  1. I enjoyed reading your work. I'll come back for more

    Keep up the good work :) from TheStillery, a stuart bar in Florida

    ReplyDelete